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Whether you're a Boston resident or a visitor, you'll find a tremendous variety of things to do in Boston Harbor. From exploring Boston's maritime architecture and historic exhibits, to taking a harbor cruise; there's something for everyone at Boston Harbor. So whether you are at the aquarium and museum with the kids or taking in spectacular views of the Boston skyline from the piers and parks you'll leave with an experience of a lifetime.

Boston Harbor Hotels offers great rates on a terrific selection of hotels in and near Boston Harbor. All of our hotels have been approved by AAA and the Mobile Travel Guide, and have been inspected by our staff for quality assurance. We work with local hotels to provide you with generous savings off of regular hotel rack rates. Be sure to check out our custom hotel map feature to find your perfect accommodation and enjoy your stay at Boston Harbor!


Today's Port of Boston has been virtually transformed since the stagnation of the immediate postwar years. The port's rebirth began in 1956, when an ineffective, locally-controlled port commission was replaced by the autonomous, self-supported, Massachusetts Port Authority (Massport). Massport immediately began the difficult job of buying up and rehabilitating abandoned or deteriorated property, updating rail and road links and, in general, preparing the port for changes in the world shipping industry.

That change really hit home in 1966, when Sea-Land pioneered the use of shipping "containers" in the trans-Atlantic trade (shipping containers are standardized 20 or 40 foot boxes which can be mounted on truck chassis or stacked up to eight high in the holds of ships). Massport's Castle Island Container Terminal was constructed for Sea-Land and became one of the first container terminals in the country.

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Today's Port of Boston has been virtually transformed since the stagnation of the immediate postwar years. The port's rebirth began in 1956, when an ineffective, locally-controlled port commission was replaced by the autonomous, self-supported, Massachusetts Port Authority (Massport). Massport immediately began the difficult job of buying up and rehabilitating abandoned or deteriorated property, updating rail and road links and, in general, preparing the port for changes in the world shipping industry.

That change really hit home in 1966, when Sea-Land pioneered the use of shipping "containers" in the trans-Atlantic trade (shipping containers are standardized 20 or 40 foot boxes which can be mounted on truck chassis or stacked up to eight high in the holds of ships). Massport's Castle Island Container Terminal was constructed for Sea-Land and became one of the first container terminals in the country.

By 1971, the shipping world was rapidly switching to container transportation, and a second container terminal was built by Massport in Charlestown as a common-user facility. In 1980, Sea-Land gave up its lease of Castle Island and Massport built a new , larger common-user facility on the site, later named Conley Terminal.

Since 1980, container traffic has tripled and Boston has become one of the most modern and efficient container ports in the U.S. General cargo tonnage growth has averaged 3.6% growth each year. Overall, the port handles more than 1.3 million tons of general cargo, 1.5 million tons of non-fuels bulk cargo and 12.8 million tons of bulk fuel cargos yearly.

The passenger ship industry is also expanding in the Port of Boston. Numerous four and five star cruise lines such as Cunard, Norwegian Majesty, Hapag-Lloyd and Silversea regularly call the port. With more than 62 ship calls last year alone, the port is now considered one of the fastest-growing high-end cruise markets in the country.

Boston also hosts an enormous complex of privately owned petroleum and liquefied natural gas terminals, which supply more than 90% of Massachusetts' petroleum consumption needs. The port is home to two shipyards, numerous public and private ferry operations, world-renowned marine research institutions, marinas, a major Coast Guard facility and is one of America's highest-value fishing ports.